Tag Archives: windows

Humongous IE Patch Fixes 59 Security Issues

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: Mostly by enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released today as part of Patch Day, Microsoft describes an update that fixes a whooping 59 new vulnerabilities that affect all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

The biggest story about today’s IE update is the sheer number of vulnerabilities it corrects. I don’t think I remember a Microsoft update that fixed more flaws than this one. While all 59 of these flaws are technically different, most of them share the same general scope and impact, and involve memory corruption flaws having to do with how IE handles certain HTML objects. If an attacker can lure one of your users to a web page containing malicious web code, he could exploit many of these memory corruption vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, inheriting that user’s privileges. Typically, Windows users have local administrative privileges. In that case, the attacker could exploit these flaws to gain complete control of the victim’s computer.

The update also includes fixes some information disclosure and elevation of privileges flaws as well, but the memory corruption issues pose the most risk. Technical differences aside, this is a very important IE update that plugs many serious holes in IE. Furthermore, this update also fixes a zero day IE flaw that the Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) disclosed a few weeks ago. You should download and install the IE cumulative patch immediately.

Keep in mind, today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way, and the vulnerabilities described in today’s bulletin are perfect for use in drive-by download attacks.

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s April IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block some of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1802)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1800)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1766)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1805)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS signature update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Microsoft Black Tuesday: Seven Security Bulletins Include a Huge IE Update

If there is one day of the month you should really focus on software patching, this is the day. The second Tuesday of the month is both Microsoft and Adobe patch day. If you run a Windows shop, or you use Adobe products on any platform, it’s time for you to get patching!

As they promised, Microsoft released seven bulletins today to fix a wide range of security vulnerabilities in a number of their products, including:

  • Windows and its components,
  • Office (Word),
  • Internet Explorer (IE),
  • and Lync Server.

Microsoft rates two of the bulletins as Critical.

The big news here is the major Internet Explorer (IE) update. Not only does it fix a zero day vulnerability I discussed a few weeks ago, but it corrects a whooping total of 59 security flaws in the popular web browser. If you have Windows computers in your network, you need to patch IE immediately. The second Critical update fixes a Windows graphics component (GDI+) flaw, which attackers can leverage simply by tricking your users into viewing maliciously crafted images.

In short, if you use any of the affected Microsoft products, you should download, test, and deploy these updates as quickly as you can or you can also let Windows’ Automatic Update do it for you. You can find more information about these bulletins and updates in Microsoft’s June Summary advisory.

Adobe’s Patch Day, on the other hand, seems a bit lighter than Microsoft’s. They only released one security update fixing six security flaws in Flash Player. That said, the update fixes some pretty serious vulnerabilities that attackers could exploit just by enticing you to the wrong web site. Be sure to update Flash as well.

I’ll share more details about today’s patches on the blog throughout the day, so stay tuned.  — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

GOZeus Down – WSWiR Episode 110

NSA Facial Recognition, OpenSSL Patch, and Zeus Takedown

It’s that time again. If you have a hankering for the latest InfoSec news, this is the place to get it. You can watch me summarize all of the week’s biggest security stories in one short video.

Today I talk about the NSA scanning the Internet for our pictures, a big OpenSSL security update, and the latest botnet takedown that puts a damper on GOZeus and Cryptolocker. Watch the video for the scoop, and check out the Extras below for other news.

Hope you have a great weekend, and stay safe out there.

(Episode Runtime: 8:33)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp46hzT6G1E

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

iPhone Ransom Message – WSWiR Episode 109

Iranian Social Hackers, XP Patch Hack, and iPhone Ransom Notes

Did you have time to follow security mailings lists, check out infosec news sites, or find that latest patches this week? If not, don’t worry. This weekly video blog will cover the top three computer security news items each Friday for you. Subscribe to this blog or the YouTube channel to stay informed.

This episode covers an Iranian hacking campaign where attackers pose journalists on social media sites, shares a tip about a Windows XP registry hack that could give you security updates until 2019, and highlights a recent iCloud attack that attackers are using to hold iPhones for ransom. Click play for the details, and check out the reference section for other stories.

(Episode Runtime: 7:38)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sa-2RLe_sr4

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Ebay Pwned – WSWiR Episode 108

Ebay Data Breach, IE8 0Day, and Alleged Chinese Hackers

With all the information security (InfoSec) news coming out each week, it’s hard to believe anyone can keep up with it; let alone an already busy IT professional with other things on his plate. If that sounds like you, rather than worrying about finding the most important security news you can let my weekly summary video fill you in.

Today’s episode covers the 145M record Ebay breach, and new zero day Internet Explorer (IE) 8 vulnerability released early by the supposedly good guys, and the Department of Justice’s official charges against five alleged Chinese government hackers. Check out the video below for the details, and peruse the Reference section for links to other InfoSec stories.

If you’re in the USA, enjoy your extended holiday weekend. See you next time…

(Episode Runtime: 8:00)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ib7nI1H13P8

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

TAO Hijack Routers – WSWiR Episode 107

Tons of Patches, NSA Booby-Trapped Routers, and Alleged Iranian Hackers

If you don’t have time to follow all the information security stories popping up each week, you can let our weekly video and blog post summarize the important stuff for you.

In today’s show, I recite the big list of security patches you need to get this week, talk about how the NSA is intercepting and hacking routers to foreigners, and weigh in on whether or not the security industry is blaming advanced attacks on “nation-state” actors a bit too freely. Press play on YouTube for all the details, and don’t forget to check out the Reference section for links to other interesting InfoSec stories.

Hope you have a great weekend, and be careful shopping online!

(Episode Runtime: 8:25)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdOHsV88z4Y

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Four Windows Bulletins Fix Group Policy, .NET, and iSCSI Flaws

Severity: Medium

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: All current versions of Windows (and related components like .NET Framework)
  • How an attacker exploits them: Multiple vectors of attack, though most require authenticated attackers to do things locally
  • Impact: In the worst case, an authenticated attacker can gain complete control of your Windows computer
  • What to do: Install the appropriate Microsoft patches as soon as possible, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

Today, Microsoft released four security bulletins describing five vulnerabilities in Windows and related components, such as the .NET Framework. An authenticated attacker could exploit the worst of these flaws to potentially gain complete control of your Windows PC. We recommend you download, test, and deploy these critical updates as quickly as possible.

The summary below lists the vulnerabilities, in order from highest to lowest severity.

  • MS14-025: Group Policy Preferences Password Elevation of Privilege Flaw

Group Policy is the Windows feature that allows administrators to push configuration and settings to other Windows computers throughout their network. Group Policy Preferences are simply an extension of settings you can push via Group Policy. Microsoft’s alert describes a vulnerability in the way Active Directory sends password information with certain Group Policy Preferences. If you use Group Policy to set system administrator accounts, map drives, or run scheduled tasks—all things that require privileges—Group Policy stores an encrypted version of the password or credential needed for this task on the local computer. Local, authenticated attackers can then use that information to crack the password, and perhaps elevate their privileges. For instance, if you use your domain administrator account to run a particular scheduled task on every Windows computer network when it boots, local Windows users may have the information they need to crack your domain administrator account. That said, attackers would need valid credentials to log into one of your windows computers in order to exploit this flaw. So this primarily poses an insider risk.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-026:  .NET Framework Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability

The .NET Framework is a software framework used by developers to create custom Windows and web applications. Though it only ships by default with Windows Vista, you’ll find it on many Windows computers.

The .NET Framework suffers from an unspecified elevation of privilege vulnerability. If an authenticated attacker can send specially crafted data to an app that uses .NET Remoting, he can exploit this flaw to execute code on that system with full system privileges.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-027:  Windows Shell Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability

The Windows Shell is the primary GUI component for Windows. It suffers from a vulnerability having to do with its ShellExecute Application Programming Interface (API). If a local attacker can log in to one of your Windows systems and run a specially crafted program, he can exploit this flaw to execute code with local administrator privileges, thus gaining full control of the computer.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-028:  Two iSCSI DoS Vulnerabilities

iSCSI is a standard that supports network based storage devices. The Windows iSCSI component suffers from two Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerabilities. By sending a large amount of specially crafted packets to the iSCSI service (TCP 3260), an attacker could exploit this flaw to cause the iSCSI service to stop responding. Of course, the attacker needs access to the iSCSI service, which most administrator might block with their firewall.

Microsoft rating: Important

Solution Path:

Microsoft has released various updates that correct all of these vulnerabilities. You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate updates throughout your network immediately. If you choose, you can also let Windows Update automatically download and install them for you. As always, you should test your updates before deploying them. I especially recommend you test the Group Policy Preference update before deploy it, as it may slightly change the way Group Policy Preferences work.

The links below point directly to the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of each bulletin, where you can find links to the various updates:

For All WatchGuard Users:

Though WatchGuard’s XTM appliances offer defenses that can mitigate the risk of some of these flaws (such as blocking TCP port 3260), attackers can exploit others locally. Since your gateway XTM appliance can’t protect you against local attacks, we recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches correcting these issues.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).


What did you think of this alert? Let us know at your.opinion.matters@watchguard.com.

May’s IE Update Corrects Two New Memory Corruptions

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released today as part of Patch Day, Microsoft describes two new vulnerabilities that affect all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

Though the two vulnerabilities differ technically, they share the same general scope and impact, and involve memory corruption flaws having to do with how IE handles certain HTML objects. If an attacker can lure one of your users to a web page containing malicious web code, he could exploit either of these memory corruption vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, inheriting that user’s privileges. Typically, Windows users have local administrative privileges. In that case, the attacker could exploit these flaws to gain complete control of the victim’s computer.

Technical differences aside, the memory corruption flaws in IE pose significant risk. You should download and install the IE cumulative patch immediately. Also note, this IE cumulative patch also includes a fix for the zero day IE flaw Microsoft fixed earlier, in an out-of-cycle update. If, for some reason, you haven’t applied that update yet, this is a good time to fix that serious zero day flaw.

Keep in mind, today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way, and the vulnerabilities described in today’s bulletin are perfect for use in drive-by download attacks.

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s April IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0310)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1815)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS 4.414 signature update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Microsoft Black Tuesday: Patches for IE, Sharepoint, Office, and Windows

Calling all Microsoft administrators! It’s Microsoft Patch Day, and their security updates are available for download.

You know the drill by now. As they do every second Tuesday of the month, Microsoft has released May’s important security updates. You can find this month’s Patch Day highlights in Microsoft’s summary post, but here’s what you really need to know:

  • Microsoft released eight bulletins, two rated Critical and the rest Important.
  • The affected products include
    • Windows
    • Office
    • Internet Explorer (IE)
    • and Sharepoint Server.
  • Attackers are apparently exploiting some of the Windows and IE vulnerabilities in the wild already, in what Microsoft calls “limited, targeted attacks.
  • As expected, Windows XP users aren’t getting patches this month (or from hereafter).

In short, if you use any of the affected Microsoft products, you should download, test, and deploy these updates as quickly as you can. You can also let Windows’ Automatic Update do it for you. While I don’t recommend Automatic Update on servers (due to potential patch bugs), I do think you should enable it on your clients computers. As always, concentrate on installing the Critical updates as soon as you can (especially the IE one this month), and handle the others later.

I’ll share more details about today’s patches on the blog throughout the day, though these posts may be slightly delayed due to my participation in WatchGuard’s US Partner Summit.  — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

World Password Day – WSWiR Episode 106

MS Patch Day, 4chan Hacked, and Password Security

If you’re too busy helping your users and maintaining your network to read the latest information security news, you might miss out on new tip that could save your network. No worries. Let my short, weekly Infosec video summarize the week’s biggest news for you.

Today, I warn you about all the upcoming patches next Tuesday, talk about a popular web site hack and what administrators can learn from it, and share my three primary password tips for World Password Day. Click play below for all the details, and take a peek at the Reference section for links to other stories.

Enjoy your weekend, and stay safe out there.

(Episode Runtime: 7:32)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKU3Qoaj_Dw

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,561 other followers

%d bloggers like this: