Tag Archives: Patches

iOS Backdoor – WSWiR Episode 114

Firefox 31, Tails 0day, and iOS Backdoor

Are you curious about the latest network breaches, dangerous new zero day exploits, or breaking security research, but too busy to find all this information on your own? No worries. We summarize the most important security news for you in our weekly security video every Friday.

In this week’s episode, you’ll learn how the latest Firefox update makes it harder to download malware, why you can’t rely on some anonymizers, and whether or not you should worry about the rumored backdoor in iOS. Check out the video for the full scoop, and don’t forget to peruse the extra stories in the Reference section below.

(Episode Runtime: 7:51)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qg1wsjzjC4Q

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Weak Passwords are Good? – WSWiR Episode 113

Oracle Patches, Project Zero, and Password Problems

Another week, another big batch of InfoSec news. If your IT job is already overwhelming you with tasks, leaving you no time to keep up with computer and network security, “I’ve got ya bro.” Check out our weekly security news summary for all the important action.

Today’s episode covers Oracle’s quarterly Critical Patch Update (CPU), a neat security project from Google, and a bevy of password security related news and issues. It’s all in the video, so give it a play. Also, don’t forget the Reference section below for other interesting news.

Enjoy your summer weekend, and stay safe!

(Episode Runtime: 8:59)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOtbuwhqZVo

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Hardware Malware – WSWiR Episode 112

Tons of Patches, Facebook Botnets, and Infected Hand Scanners

After a couple weeks of hiatus, we’re finally back with our weekly security news summary video. If you want to learn about all the week’s important security news from one convenience resource, this is the place to get it.

This episode covers the latest popular software security updates from the last two weeks, and interesting Litecoin mining botnet that Facebook helped eradicate, and an advanced attack campaign that leverages pre-infected hardware products. Watch the video for the details, and check out the Reference’s for more information, and links to many other interesting InfoSec stories.

Enjoy your summer weekend, and stay safe!

(Episode Runtime: 7:37)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAHYUW1KkM0

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Microsoft Service Bus DoS Mostly Affects Enterprise Web Developers.

Among this week’s Microsoft security bulletins is one that likely only affects a small subset of Microsoft customers, and thus not worth a full security alert.

Microsoft Service Bus is a messaging component that ships with server versions of Windows, providing enterprise developers with the means to create message-driven applications. According to Microsoft’s bulletin, Service Bus suffers from a denial of service (DoS) vulnerability involving it’s inability to properly handle a sequence of specially crafted messages. If you have created an application that uses Service Bus, an attacker who could send specially crafted messages to your application could exploit this flaw to prevent the application from responding to further messages. You’d have to restart the service to regain functionality.

Windows itself doesn’t really use Service Bus for anything, but if you have internal applications that do, this vulnerability may be significant to you. If you use Service Bus, be sure to check out the bulletin to get your updates. — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Windows Updates Mend Critical Journal Vulnerability & More

Severity: High

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: All current versions of Windows (and related components like XML Core Services)
  • How an attacker exploits them: Multiple vectors of attack, including enticing you to malicious web sites, or into interacting with malicious documents or images.
  • Impact: In the worst case, an attacker can gain complete control of your Windows computer
  • What to do: Install the appropriate Microsoft patches as soon as possible, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

Today, Microsoft released four security bulletins describing five vulnerabilities in Windows and related components, such as XML Core Services. An attacker could exploit the worst of these flaws to potentially gain complete control of your Windows PC. We recommend you download, test, and deploy these critical updates as quickly as possible.

The summary below lists the vulnerabilities, in order from highest to lowest severity.

Windows Journal is a basic note taking program that ships with Windows systems (though the server versions of Windows do not install it by default). It suffers from a vulnerability involving how it  handles specially crafted Journal files (.JNT). If an attacker can trick you into opening a malicious Journal file, perhaps embedded in an email or web site, he can exploit this flaw to execute code on your computer, with your privileges. If you have local administrative privileges, the attacker gains full control of your computer.

Microsoft rating: Critical

  • MS14-039:  On-Screen Keyboard Privilege Elevation Vulnerability

Windows ships with an accessibility option called the On-Screen Keyboard (OSK), which displays a virtual keyboard on your display you can use for character entry. It suffers from a local elevation of privilege (EoP) vulnerability. Basically, low privileged processes can run the OSK and use it to run other programs with the logged in users privileges. However, to exploit this flaw an attacker would first have to exploit another vulnerability in a low integrity process, which lessens the severity of this issue.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-040:  AFD Privilege Elevation Vulnerability

The Ancillary Function Driver (AFD) is a Windows component that helps manage Winsock TCP/IP communications. It suffers from a local elevation of privilege (EoP) issue. By running a specially crafted application, an attacker can leverage this flaw to execute code with full system privileges, regardless of his actual user privilege. However, in order to run his special program, the attacker would first need to gain local access to your Windows computers using valid credentials. This factor significantly reduces the risk of this flaw.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-041:  DirectShow Privilege Elevation Vulnerability

DirectShow (code-named Quartz) is a multimedia component that helps Windows handle various media streams, images, and files. It suffers from a local elevation of privilege (EoP) vulnerability. If an attacker can exploit another vulnerability to gain access to a low integrity process, she could then exploit this flaw this flaw to elevate her privileges to that of the currently logged in user.

Microsoft rating: Important

Microsoft’s Patch Day Video Summary:

Microsoft has recently started producing short videos to summarize each month’s Patch Day, which I’ve linked here for your convenience.

(Runtime: 2:24)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3j-5-xIMgks

Solution Path:

Microsoft has released various updates that correct all of these vulnerabilities. You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate updates throughout your network immediately. If you choose, you can also let Windows Update automatically download and install them for you. As always, you should test your updates before deploying them.

The links below point directly to the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of each bulletin, where you can find links to the various updates:

For All WatchGuard Users:

WatchGuard’s XTM appliances offer defenses that can mitigate the risk of some of these flaws; especially the Critical Windows Journal vulnerability. If you choose, you can leverage our proxies to prevent your users from receiving Journal files (.JNT) via email, web sites, or FTP sites. However, attackers can exploit some of the other flaws locally. Since your gateway XTM appliance can’t protect you against local attacks, we recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches correcting these issues.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).


What did you think of this alert? Let us know at your.opinion.matters@watchguard.com.

TweetDeck XSS – WSWiR Episode 111

Patch Day, P.F. Changs Hack, and TweetDeck XSS

This week delivered a lot of infosec news and a ton of software security updates. If you didn’t have time to follow it all, check out our weekly computer security video to fill in the blanks.

During today’s episode, I cover the critical patches from Microsoft, Adobe and Mozilla, mention the latest credit card breach against a U.S. restaurant chain, and talk about the cross-site scripting worm spreading via TweetDeck. Click play below to learn more, and check out the References for other interesting infosec stories.

Before wishing you a great weekend, here are a couple of quick show notes. First, I’m starting a vacation during the middle of next week, so I won’t be publishing this weekly video for the next two weeks. It will return in July.

Second, if you are a WatchGuard customer curious about our OpenSSL updates, we are in the process of posting new versions of software for many of our products. Keep your eye on this blog, as those will likely start coming out early next week.

(Episode Runtime: 7:37)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbGqdrxvOyA

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Word 2007 Patch Fixes Embedded Font Vulnerability

Severity: High

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: Microsoft Word 2007 (and related components)
  • How an attacker exploits them: By enticing users to open or interact with a maliciously crafted Word document
  • Impact: In the worst case, an attacker can gain complete control of your Windows computer
  • What to do: Install the appropriate Microsoft patches as soon as possible, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you.

Exposure:

As part of today’s Patch Day, Microsoft released a security bulletin describing a vulnerability affecting Word 2007, and related software like the Office compatibility pack.

Word is the popular word processor that ships with Office.  It suffers from A memory corruption vulnerabilities having to do with how it handles embedded fonts in documents. By luring one of your users into downloading and opening a malicious Word document, an attacker can exploit this flaw to execute code on that user’s computer, with that user’s privileges. If your users have local administrator privileges, the attacker gains complete control of their PCs.

Microsoft only rates this update as Important (their medium severity), since it requires user interaction to succeed. However, we’ve seen many attackers successfully use malicious Office documents in emails, as part of their advanced spear-phishing campaigns. For that reason, we recommend you install Microsoft’s Word updates as soon as you can.

Solution Path:

Microsoft has released a Word (and related product) update to correct these vulnerabilities. You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate updates throughout your network as soon as possible. If you choose, you can also let Windows Update automatically download and install these updates for you.

See the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s Word bulletin for links to the updates.

For All WatchGuard Users:

WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus service can often prevent the most common malicious documents from reaching your users. You can also leverage our XTM appliance’s proxies policies to block all Word documents if you like; though most administrators prefer not to since Office documents are often shared as part of business. To fully protect yourself, we recommend you install Microsoft’s updates.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches correcting these issues.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).


What did you think of this alert? Let us know at your.opinion.matters@watchguard.com.

Windows Updates Fix GDI+, RDP, and TCP Vulnerabilities

Severity: High

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: All current versions of Windows (and related components like XML Core Services)
  • How an attacker exploits them: Multiple vectors of attack, including enticing you to malicious web sites, or into interacting with malicious documents or images.
  • Impact: In the worst case, an attacker can gain complete control of your Windows computer
  • What to do: Install the appropriate Microsoft patches as soon as possible, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

Today, Microsoft released four security bulletins describing five vulnerabilities in Windows and related components, such as XML Core Services. An attacker could exploit the worst of these flaws to potentially gain complete control of your Windows PC. We recommend you download, test, and deploy these critical updates as quickly as possible.

The summary below lists the vulnerabilities, in order from highest to lowest severity.

  • MS14-036: Two GDI+ Code Execution Vulnerabilities

The Graphics Device Interface (GDI+) is one of the Windows components that helps applications output graphics, to your display or printer. GDI+ suffers from two security flaws. Though they differ technically, the flaws share the same scope and impact, and have to do with how GDI+ handles specially crafted documents or images. If an attack can entice one of your users into viewing a malicious image or document, perhaps embedded in an email or web site, he can exploit either flaw to execute code on that user’s computer, with that user’s privileges. If your users have local administrative privileges, the attacker gains full control of their computer.

Microsoft rating: Critical

  • MS14-033:  MSXML Information Disclosure Vulnerability

Microsoft XML Core Services (MSXML)  is a component that helps Windows, Internet Explorer, and other Microsoft products handle XML content. It often ships with various versions of Windows, and other Microsoft products like Office, SharePoint Server, Groove Server, and Expressions. If you have a Windows computer, you very likely have MSXML.

According to today’s bulletin, MSXML suffers from an information disclosure vulnerability. If an attacker can entice one of your users to a specially crafted web site, or into opening a malicious document, she could invoke MSXML and leverage this flaw to obtain sensitive information from your user’s system. Specifically, the attacker can gain access to some local path information, and your user’s username.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-031:  TCP Protocol Denial of Service Flaw

As you would expect, the Windows TCP/IP stack is a set of networking protocols that allows your computer to get on the Internet and participate in modern networking. Unfortunately, the Windows TCP/IP stack suffers from an unspecified Denial of Server (DoS) vulnerability involving its inability to properly parse a specially crafted sequence of TCP packets. By sending a sequence of packets, an attacker could leverage this flaw to cause you computer to stop responding, causing a DoS situation. However, the attacker would have to initiate a large number of connections, and have control over the TCP options field of each packet.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-030:  RDP traffic tampering vulnerability

The Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) is a Microsoft communication standard designed to allow you to gain access to your computers over a network to directly control your desktop. Unfortunately, the RDP component that ships with Windows doesn’t use very robust encryption by default. If an attacker can intercept your RDP traffic in a Man-in-the-Middle (MitM) attack, he could tamper with the RDP session in a way that allowed him to read session information or modify the RDP session. You can enable Network Level Authentication (NLA) to mitigate the risk of this flaw

Microsoft rating: Important

Solution Path:

Microsoft has released various updates that correct all of these vulnerabilities. You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate updates throughout your network immediately. If you choose, you can also let Windows Update automatically download and install them for you. As always, you should test your updates before deploying them.

The links below point directly to the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of each bulletin, where you can find links to the various updates:

For All WatchGuard Users:

Though WatchGuard’s XTM appliances offer defenses that can mitigate the risk of some of these flaws (such as blocking TCP traffic), attackers can exploit others locally. Since your gateway XTM appliance can’t protect you against local attacks, we recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches correcting these issues.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).


What did you think of this alert? Let us know at your.opinion.matters@watchguard.com.

Microsoft Black Tuesday: Seven Security Bulletins Include a Huge IE Update

If there is one day of the month you should really focus on software patching, this is the day. The second Tuesday of the month is both Microsoft and Adobe patch day. If you run a Windows shop, or you use Adobe products on any platform, it’s time for you to get patching!

As they promised, Microsoft released seven bulletins today to fix a wide range of security vulnerabilities in a number of their products, including:

  • Windows and its components,
  • Office (Word),
  • Internet Explorer (IE),
  • and Lync Server.

Microsoft rates two of the bulletins as Critical.

The big news here is the major Internet Explorer (IE) update. Not only does it fix a zero day vulnerability I discussed a few weeks ago, but it corrects a whooping total of 59 security flaws in the popular web browser. If you have Windows computers in your network, you need to patch IE immediately. The second Critical update fixes a Windows graphics component (GDI+) flaw, which attackers can leverage simply by tricking your users into viewing maliciously crafted images.

In short, if you use any of the affected Microsoft products, you should download, test, and deploy these updates as quickly as you can or you can also let Windows’ Automatic Update do it for you. You can find more information about these bulletins and updates in Microsoft’s June Summary advisory.

Adobe’s Patch Day, on the other hand, seems a bit lighter than Microsoft’s. They only released one security update fixing six security flaws in Flash Player. That said, the update fixes some pretty serious vulnerabilities that attackers could exploit just by enticing you to the wrong web site. Be sure to update Flash as well.

I’ll share more details about today’s patches on the blog throughout the day, so stay tuned.  — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Four Windows Bulletins Fix Group Policy, .NET, and iSCSI Flaws

Severity: Medium

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: All current versions of Windows (and related components like .NET Framework)
  • How an attacker exploits them: Multiple vectors of attack, though most require authenticated attackers to do things locally
  • Impact: In the worst case, an authenticated attacker can gain complete control of your Windows computer
  • What to do: Install the appropriate Microsoft patches as soon as possible, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

Today, Microsoft released four security bulletins describing five vulnerabilities in Windows and related components, such as the .NET Framework. An authenticated attacker could exploit the worst of these flaws to potentially gain complete control of your Windows PC. We recommend you download, test, and deploy these critical updates as quickly as possible.

The summary below lists the vulnerabilities, in order from highest to lowest severity.

  • MS14-025: Group Policy Preferences Password Elevation of Privilege Flaw

Group Policy is the Windows feature that allows administrators to push configuration and settings to other Windows computers throughout their network. Group Policy Preferences are simply an extension of settings you can push via Group Policy. Microsoft’s alert describes a vulnerability in the way Active Directory sends password information with certain Group Policy Preferences. If you use Group Policy to set system administrator accounts, map drives, or run scheduled tasks—all things that require privileges—Group Policy stores an encrypted version of the password or credential needed for this task on the local computer. Local, authenticated attackers can then use that information to crack the password, and perhaps elevate their privileges. For instance, if you use your domain administrator account to run a particular scheduled task on every Windows computer network when it boots, local Windows users may have the information they need to crack your domain administrator account. That said, attackers would need valid credentials to log into one of your windows computers in order to exploit this flaw. So this primarily poses an insider risk.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-026:  .NET Framework Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability

The .NET Framework is a software framework used by developers to create custom Windows and web applications. Though it only ships by default with Windows Vista, you’ll find it on many Windows computers.

The .NET Framework suffers from an unspecified elevation of privilege vulnerability. If an authenticated attacker can send specially crafted data to an app that uses .NET Remoting, he can exploit this flaw to execute code on that system with full system privileges.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-027:  Windows Shell Elevation of Privilege Vulnerability

The Windows Shell is the primary GUI component for Windows. It suffers from a vulnerability having to do with its ShellExecute Application Programming Interface (API). If a local attacker can log in to one of your Windows systems and run a specially crafted program, he can exploit this flaw to execute code with local administrator privileges, thus gaining full control of the computer.

Microsoft rating: Important

  • MS14-028:  Two iSCSI DoS Vulnerabilities

iSCSI is a standard that supports network based storage devices. The Windows iSCSI component suffers from two Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerabilities. By sending a large amount of specially crafted packets to the iSCSI service (TCP 3260), an attacker could exploit this flaw to cause the iSCSI service to stop responding. Of course, the attacker needs access to the iSCSI service, which most administrator might block with their firewall.

Microsoft rating: Important

Solution Path:

Microsoft has released various updates that correct all of these vulnerabilities. You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate updates throughout your network immediately. If you choose, you can also let Windows Update automatically download and install them for you. As always, you should test your updates before deploying them. I especially recommend you test the Group Policy Preference update before deploy it, as it may slightly change the way Group Policy Preferences work.

The links below point directly to the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of each bulletin, where you can find links to the various updates:

For All WatchGuard Users:

Though WatchGuard’s XTM appliances offer defenses that can mitigate the risk of some of these flaws (such as blocking TCP port 3260), attackers can exploit others locally. Since your gateway XTM appliance can’t protect you against local attacks, we recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches correcting these issues.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).


What did you think of this alert? Let us know at your.opinion.matters@watchguard.com.

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