Tag Archives: internet explorer

Heartbleed Bug- WSWiR Episode 102

April Patch Day, Raided Pen-Tester, and OpenSSL Heartbleed

Information security news never stops, even if I have to post it from a Changi Airport lounge. If you need to learn the latest cyber security news, including what to do about the biggest vulnerability of the year (so far), you’ve found the right weekly video blog.

This week’s “on-the-road” episode covers Adobe and Microsoft’s Patch Day, an allegory on why you should avoid greyhat pen-testing, but most important of all, information and advice about the major OpenSSL Heartbleed vulnerability. If you use the Internet, you need to know about the Heartbleed flaw, so click play below to watch this week’s video. Finally, make sure to check the Reference section for links to the stories and some extras; especially if you are interested in all the WatchGuard Heartbleed information.

(Episode Runtime: 8:05)

Direct YouTube Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEw-o2GQd1U

Episode References:

Extras:

Heartbleed described by XKCD

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

IE Patch Squashes Six Memory Corruption Flaws

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released today as part of Patch Day, Microsoft describes six new vulnerabilities that affect all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

Though these vulnerabilities differ technically, they share the same general scope and impact, and involve various memory corruption flaws having to do with how IE handles certain HTML objects. If an attacker can lure one of your users to a web page containing malicious web code, he could exploit any one of these memory corruption vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, inheriting that user’s privileges. Typically, Windows users have local administrative privileges. In that case, the attacker could exploit these flaws to gain complete control of the victim’s computer.

Technical differences aside, the memory corruption flaws in IE pose significant risk. You should download and install the IE cumulative patch immediately.

Keep in mind, today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way, and the vulnerabilities described in today’s bulletin are perfect for use in drive-by download attacks.

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s April IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block many of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1755)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1753)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1751)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1752)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Microsoft Black Tuesday: Word 0day Fix & More

Microsoft’s monthly Patch Day went live earlier today. As expected they released four security bulletins, fixing flaws in Windows, Internet Explorer (IE), and Office. Microsoft rates two of the bulletins as critical, one that fixes Word vulnerabilities (including a zero day one I warned about earlier) and another that fixes IE flaws.

If you use the affected Microsoft products, you should apply these patches as soon as you can. I’d apply the updates in the order Microsoft recommends; the Word update first, the IE one second, and the Windows and Publisher updates last.

In any case, I’ll share more details about today’s Patch Day bulletins on the blog throughout the day.  However, I am currently traveling in Asia, so my blog posts may be late due to timezone issues and travel. So I recommend you check out the April bulletin summary in the meantime, if you’d like an early peek. Also, keep in mind that Adobe released a Flash update today as well. — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

APT Blocker – WSWiR Episode 101

April Patch Day, NSA Encryption Backdoors, and APT Blocker

Ready for your weekly summary of InfoSec news? Well here it is.

This week’s episode covers what you need to know about next week’s Microsoft patch day, shares details about the latest NSA/RSA encryption scandal, and unveils WatchGuard’s latest security service, which can protect you from zero day malware. Watch the video for the whole scoop, and scope out the references for links to other news.

I continue my travels in Asia next week, so the video may continue to post at unusual times. We’ll be back to our normal scheduling soon.

(Episode Runtime: 5:23)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkFmxEVveRY

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Out-of-Cycle Word FixIt Corrects Zero Day Vulnerability

If you’re worried about spear phishing attacks (and if you’re not, you should be), grab Microsoft’s emergency FixIt to mitigate a zero day vulnerability attackers are exploiting in the wild.

In a security advisory released yesterday, Microsoft warned of a zero day vulnerability in Word, which attackers are exploiting in what Microsoft describes as limited, targeted attacks. Apparently, the exploit in the wild targets Word 2010, but the flaw affects other versions of Word as well. Since this is an early advisory, it doesn’t describe the flaw in much technical detail. However, it does mention attackers can trigger the flaw with specially crafted rich text format (RTF) files. If an attacker can entice you to view a malicious RTF in Word, he could exploit this vulnerability to execute code on you computer, with your privileges. If you are an administrator, the attacker gains complete control of your PC.

By default, most current version of Office use Word as Outlook’s email viewer. This mean attackers can trigger this flaw just by getting you to open an RTF attached to an email. According to some on Twitter, simply previewing an email with a malicious RTF triggers the flaw.

While Microsoft hasn’t had time to release a full patch yet, they have posted a FixIt that mitigates the risk of this vulnerability. If you use Office, I highly recommend you install the FixIt as soon as you can. Also, Microsoft’s Enhanced Mitigation Experience Toolkit (EMET) can mitigate the risk of any type of memory corruption flaw. In general, I recommend you install EMET on Windows machines to protect them from any zero day, memory-related issues.

I’ll post more details about this flaw during an upcoming Patch Day, when Microsoft releases the final update. In the meantime, if you’d like more information about it you can check out Microsoft’s security blog post— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept

 

Latest IE Update Patches Zero Day Hole and 17 Others

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released today as part of Patch Day, Microsoft describes 18 new vulnerabilities that affect all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

Though many of these vulnerabilities differ technically, the majority of them share the same general scope and impact, and involve various memory corruption flaws having to do with how IE handles certain HTML objects. If an attacker can lure one of your users to a web page containing malicious web code, he could exploit any one of these memory corruption vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, inheriting that user’s privileges. Typically, Windows users have local administrative privileges. In that case, the attacker could exploit these flaws to gain complete control of the victim’s computer.

Most importantly, attackers have been exploiting one of these memory corruption corruption flaws in the wild. Recently, security researchers have discovered attackers exploiting this particular IE flaw in two watering hole attacks, where they hijack legitimate websites and inject them with malicious code, hoping to infect the people who visit those sites. Since attackers are already exploiting at least one of these issues in the wild, we highly recommend you apply this IE update immediately

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s December IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block many of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0297)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0298)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0299)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0302)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0303)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0304)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0305)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0306)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0309)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0311)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0312)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0313)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0324)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0322)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0314)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Microsoft Black Tuesday: Patch IE Zero Day & Windows Vulnerabilities

Microsoft’s March Patch Day is live, and looks to be by the numbers. As expected, they released five bulletins, including one that contains a fix for a zero day vulnerability in Internet Explorer. Their Patch Day summary highlights five security bulletins that fix 23 vulnerabilities in various Microsoft products, including Internet Explorer (IE), Windows and its various components, such as Silverlight. They rate two of these bulletins as Critical, and the rest as Important.

MS Patch Day: March 2014As I mentioned in my notification post, the most important update this month is the IE cumulative patch. Besides fixing 23 memory corruption flaws, many of which attackers could exploit to execute code, one specifically fixes a critical zero day flaw which attackers have been leveraging in watering hole attacks. Though Microsoft released a Fix-it for this vulnerability a few weeks ago, this update completely corrects the underlying issue. Make sure to install the IE update on all your clients as soon as possible. Hopefully, you already have Automatic Updates set to do it for you. Of course, you should also install the Windows updates too, especially the DirectShow one. If an attacker can trick one of your users into viewing a malicious JPEG image, he could exploit it to gain control of that user’s computer, with their privileges. You don’t want that.

While we are talking about Windows updates, let me take this time to continue to remind you that these updates are among the last that Windows XP will receive. XP users will likely see a few more updates next month, but after than it goes End-of-Life. Hopefully, most of you are saying, “Why do I care? I’ve been using Windows 7 or above for years.” But for the stragglers out there, you might want to consider upgrading to a more recent version of Windows. While I don’t want to come off as promoting Microsofts “upgrade” sales message, I do believe XP will likely pose more risk once the official updates stop. It seems very likely that some cyber attacker (or nation-state groups) out there are sitting on a zero day XP exploit or two; saving them until after Microsoft’s fixes run out. You might want to get away from XP before that happens.

In any case, I’ll share more details about today’s Patch Day bulletins on the blog throughout the day. Meanwhile, check out the March  bulletin summary now, if you’d like an early peek. — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

0day Watering Holes – WSWiR Episode 96

Flash and IE 0day, Watering Holes, and Router Worms

It’s Friday, Friday, gotta get your InfoSec on Friday….

Seriously though. If you are looking for a quick round-up of this week’s biggest security news, this is your show. In it, I cover what I think are the top three information and network security stories of the week, vlog style. If that sounds good, keep reading.

This week’s episode covers an advanced watering hole attack that leverages two zero day vulnerabilities, a worm that’s infecting a popular brand consumer router, and new vulnerabilities that affect devices which fall under “the Internet of things” category. If you’d like all the details, including how to protect yourself, watch the video below. Or if you prefer to read, check out the Reference section for links to those stories and more.

Quick show note. Next week I’ll be attending the annual RSA Security Conference. Though I still hope to produce a video on the road, I may have to settle for a text version of our weekly Infosec news if I get too busy. Keep an eye on the blog for the latest, and have a great weekend.

(Episode Runtime: 8:57)

Direct YouTube Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbxXXLov6Ek

Episode References:

Extras:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Grab Adobe and Microsoft’s Emergency Flash and IE Fixes

Let’s start with the short version. Yesterday, both Microsoft and Adobe released out-of-cycle updates to fix zero day security vulnerabilities that advanced attackers are exploiting in the wild via “watering hole” campaigns. If you use these products and haven’t installed the updates, go get the Flash and Internet Explorer (IE) fixes now!

The slightly longer story is early this week (during the U.S. President’s Day holiday) two security companies, FireEye and Websense, independently reported discovering two different legitimate web sites serving malware via a drive-by download attack. The web sites included a U.S Veteran’s site (VFW.org) and a French aeronautical company’s web site. The malicious code on these sites exploited two previously undiscovered, zero day vulnerabilities affecting Adobe Flash, and IE 9 and 10. They also delivered some relatively advanced trojan malware (in one case, Gh0strat), which has been used before in attacks that seem to come from China-based hackers. Since these sites have very specific user bases (military and ex-military, or aeronautical engineers), these attack campaigns fall into the category of watering hole attacks, where smart attackers purposely hijack web sites they know their target visits in hopes of poisoning the target’s watering hole. If you’d like to learn more about these types of attacks, and other web threats, you can check out a presentation I recently gave on the subject in a BrightTALK. You can also learn more about these specific attacks in this week’s upcoming security video.

In any case, yesterday both Microsoft and Adobe released advisories that include updates or FixIts that patch these zero day flaws. While you probably haven’t run into these exploits yet, unless you happen to fall into the two victim bases for these attacks, I expect criminal attackers to quickly start leveraging these new flaws. Now that they are public, you can expect criminal hackers to quickly incorporate the new attacks into the exploit kits they sell on the underground. Once they do, you’ll start to see these exploits popping up every where, to serve normal criminal malware. In other words, if you use IE or Flash, you should go get the updates immediately. You can find links to them in Microsoft and Adobe’s advisories. — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept

 

Unexpected IE Patch Corrects 24 Critical Vulnerabilities

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In an unexpected security bulletin released today as part of Patch Day, Microsoft describes 24 new vulnerabilities that affect all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

Though many of these vulnerabilities differ technically, the majority of them share the same general scope and impact, and involve various memory corruption flaws having to do with how IE handles certain HTML objects. If an attacker can lure one of your users to a web page containing malicious web code, he could exploit any one of these memory corruption vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, inheriting that user’s privileges. Typically, Windows users have local administrative privileges. In that case, the attacker could exploit these flaws to gain complete control of the victim’s computer.

The other vulnerabilities include an elevation of privilege flaw and cross-domain information disclosure issue. If you’d like to know more about the technical differences between these flaws, see the “Vulnerability Information” section of Microsoft’s bulletin. Technical differences aside, the memory corruption flaws in IE pose significant risk. You should download and install the IE cumulative patch immediately.

Keep in mind, today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way, and the vulnerabilities described in today’s bulletin are perfect for use in drive-by download attacks.

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s December IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block many of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0267)
  •  WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0269)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0270)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0271)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0272)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0274)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0275)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0276)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0273)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0290)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0289)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0288)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0287)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0286)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0285)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0284)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0283)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0281)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0279)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0278)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-0277)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

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