Tag Archives: drive-by download

Hacking Team Updates and RC4 Insecurity – WSWiR Text Edition

 RC4’s Dead and White House On Security

Last week, I was in the UK attending a WatchGuard Partner conference, and as a result I only shot two videos and skipped my weekly summary. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of interesting information security (infosec) news, which I don’t want you to miss. So to make up for it, let me quickly share three infosec stories I would have covered if I had had more time:

  1. Lots of The Hacking Team breach updates: Through the week, we learned a lot more about The Hacking Team organization from the 400GBs of data made public by their network breach. For instance, they had more zero day exploits that first suspected; They leveraged BGP flaws to launch man-in-the-middle attacks, and they worked with both the FBI and DEA to snoop out TOR users. If you’re following this infosec drama, Wikileaks has made all The Hacking Team’s stolen email public. Check out the links below to learn the latest Hacking Team gossip.
  2. The White House brags about cybersecurity: Last week, the White House released a CyberSecurity Fact Sheet detailing everything the US government has done this year to improve the nation’s cybersecurity stance. Highlights include creating a new office in charge of the problem, and encouraging the government and private industry to share threat intelligence. Check out the references if you’d like more details.
  3. RC4 gets another nail in its coffin: RC4 is a very popular hashing algorithm we’ve used for decades. Unfortunately, over the years it has been proven weak due to many vulnerabilities in this old function. Most security experts already consider RC4 dead, that said, new research [PDF] has proven RC4 even weaker. Without going into the details, this new discovery mean bad guys can break RC4 in days instead of months. If you are using RC4, it’s time to move on.

Those are the stories I missed, but the week included many others. If you are interested in all of them, feel free to peruse the Reference section below. I’ll get back to my regularly scheduled videos this week.

References:

 

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Jamie Oliver Hacked Again – Daily Security Byte EP.44

There’s a lot of InfoSec news today, but I’m most fascinated with that fact that Jamie Olivier’s web site has been hijacked yet again. It may provide a perfect example of how not to secure your web site. Check out today’s short video for details, and I threw a few extras in the References below.

 

(Episode Runtime: 1:48)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gq8GL3wsrVo

EPISODE REFERENCES:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

NSA Get Out of Our Phones – WSWiR Episode 140

According to the news cyber criminals, nation states, and even our own employees are attacking our digital networks. In fact there’s so much information security news each day, it’s hard to keep up. If you find yourself falling behind, perhaps my weekly summary video can help.

Today’s episode covers, nation-state malware, booby-trapped popular web sites, dangerous pre-loaded software, and more. Press play below to get the scoop, and feel free to browse the references for other stories.

(Episode Runtime: 10:30)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOWUsT2cWgo

EPISODE REFERENCES:

EXTRAS:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Web Security PSA – Daily Security Byte EP.26

Two more popular and legitimate web sites were hijacked to serve malware. Learn which sites to avoid and how to protect yourself from drive-by downloads in today’s daily video.

(Episode Runtime: 2:31)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DenX9ZJTH-k

EPISODE REFERENCES:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Tax Time Security Woes – WSWiR Episode 139

There’s tons of security news each week. If you can’t keep up, I try to summarize the most important stuff for you in my weekly video.

This week’s show covers a researcher leaking 10M credentials, Forbes’ website getting hacked, a TurboTax security scare, and much more. Watch the video for all the details, or check out the Reference section for other interesting stories.

(Episode Runtime: 9:50)

Direct YouTube Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mTycl-zSbVA

EPISODE REFERENCES:

EXTRAS:

— Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Latest Flash Update Plugs 18 Security Holes

Do you watch a lot of online video or play interactive web games? Perhaps your organization uses rich, interactive web-based business applications? In either case, you’ve probably installed Adobe Flash, along with the  500 million other device holders who use it. In this case, you better update Flash as soon as you can.

During Microsoft Patch day, Adobe released a security bulletin describing 18 vulnerabilities in the popular rich media web plug-in. There’s no point in covering the flaws individually, as the majority of them share the same scope and impact. In short, most of the flaws involve memory corruption issues that a smart attacker could leverage to execute code on your PC. The attacker would only have to entice you to a web site containing malicious code. In other words, most of them help attackers setup drive-by download attacks.

Though it doesn’t appear attackers are exploiting any of these flaws in the wild yet, Adobe rates there severity a “Priority 1″ for Windows and Mac users. This means you should patch within 72 hours. If you use Flash, go get the latest version, and check out Adobe’s security bulletin if you’d like more details. — Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept)

Mega IE Update Corrects 37 Vulnerabilities; Including Zero Day

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released as part of Patch Day, Microsoft posted an update that fixes a 37 new vulnerabilities in all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

All but one of the vulnerabilities described in this alert are memory corruption vulnerabilities, which share the same general scope and impact. If an attacker can lure you to a web page containing malicious web code, he can exploit these flaws to execute code on your computer, inheriting your privileges. If you have local administrative privileges, which most Windows users do, the attack could potentially gain full control of your computer.

These types of memory corruption vulnerabilities are ideal for attackers launching drive-by download attacks—a class of attack where malicious code hidden on a web page can silently install malware on your computer. Today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way. In fact, one of today’s fixes closes a zero day vulnerability that attackers have exploited in the wild. I highly recommend you install this update immediately

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s April IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block some of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4095)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4094)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability -1 (CVE-2014-4092)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability -2 (CVE-2014-4092)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4089)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4082)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4081)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4086)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4087)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4088)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4084)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4065)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4080)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2799)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS signature update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Latest IE Patch Corrects 26 Vulnerabilities

Summary:

  • These vulnerabilities affect: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: By enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released as part of Patch Day, Microsoft released an update that fixes a 26 new vulnerabilities in all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

Most of the vulnerabilities described in this alert (24 of the 26) are memory corruption vulnerabilities, which share the same general scope and impact. If an attacker can lure you to a web page containing malicious web code, he can exploit these flaws to execute code on your computer, inheriting your privileges. If you have local administrative privileges, which most Windows users do, the attack could potentially gain full control of your computer

The patch also fixes a pair of privilege escalation vulnerabilities, but the memory corruption flaws alone should convince you to update IE as soon as you can.

Keep in mind, today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way, and the vulnerabilities described in today’s bulletin are perfect for use in drive-by download attacks.

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s April IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block some of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4063)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4057)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-4050)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2824)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2823)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2820)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2799)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS signature update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

IE Update Fixes Remote Code Execution and Certificate Issues

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: Mostly by enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released as part of Patch Day, Microsoft describes an update that fixes a 23 new vulnerabilities that affect all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

Most of the vulnerabilities described in this alert (22 of the 23) are memory corruption vulnerabilities, which share the same general scope and impact. If an attacker can lure you to a web page containing malicious web code, he can exploit these memory corruption vulnerabilities to execute code on your computer, inheriting your privileges. If you have local administrative privileges, which most Windows users do, the attack could potentially gain full control of your computer

The update also fixes a publicly reported certificate handling issue having to do with how IE handles extended validation (EV) certificates and wildcards. Attackers could leverage this flaw to help make their phishing sites look more legitimate. Though this issue is pretty bad, the memory corruption flaws pose even more risk. They alone should convince you to update IE as soon as you can.

Keep in mind, today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way, and the vulnerabilities described in today’s bulletin are perfect for use in drive-by download attacks.

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s April IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block some of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1765)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2787)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2795)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2797)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2801)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-2804)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS signature update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

Humongous IE Patch Fixes 59 Security Issues

Summary:

  • This vulnerability affects: All current versions of Internet Explorer
  • How an attacker exploits it: Mostly by enticing one of your users to visit a web page containing malicious content
  • Impact: Various, in the worst case an attacker can execute code on your user’s computer, potentially gaining complete control of it
  • What to do: Deploy the appropriate Internet Explorer patches immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you

Exposure:

In a security bulletin released today as part of Patch Day, Microsoft describes an update that fixes a whooping 59 new vulnerabilities that affect all current versions of Internet Explorer (IE). Microsoft rates the aggregate severity of these new flaws as Critical.

The biggest story about today’s IE update is the sheer number of vulnerabilities it corrects. I don’t think I remember a Microsoft update that fixed more flaws than this one. While all 59 of these flaws are technically different, most of them share the same general scope and impact, and involve memory corruption flaws having to do with how IE handles certain HTML objects. If an attacker can lure one of your users to a web page containing malicious web code, he could exploit many of these memory corruption vulnerabilities to execute code on that user’s computer, inheriting that user’s privileges. Typically, Windows users have local administrative privileges. In that case, the attacker could exploit these flaws to gain complete control of the victim’s computer.

The update also includes fixes some information disclosure and elevation of privileges flaws as well, but the memory corruption issues pose the most risk. Technical differences aside, this is a very important IE update that plugs many serious holes in IE. Furthermore, this update also fixes a zero day IE flaw that the Zero Day Initiative (ZDI) disclosed a few weeks ago. You should download and install the IE cumulative patch immediately.

Keep in mind, today’s attackers often hijack legitimate web pages and booby-trap them with malicious code. Typically, they do this via hosted web ads or through SQL injection and cross-site scripting (XSS) attacks. Even recognizable and authentic websites could pose a risk to your users if hijacked in this way, and the vulnerabilities described in today’s bulletin are perfect for use in drive-by download attacks.

Solution Path:

You should download, test, and deploy the appropriate IE updates immediately, or let Windows Automatic Update do it for you. You can find links to the various IE updates in the “Affected and Non-Affected Software” section of Microsoft’s April IE security bulletin.

For All WatchGuard Users:

Good News! WatchGuard’s Gateway Antivirus and Intrusion Prevention services can often prevent these sorts of attacks, or the malware they try to distribute. For instance, our IPS signature team has developed signatures that can detect and block some of the memory corruption vulnerabilities described in Microsoft’s alert:

  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1802)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1800)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1766)
  • WEB-CLIENT Microsoft Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1805)

Your XTM appliance should get this new IPS signature update shortly.

Furthermore, our Reputation Enabled Defense (RED) and WebBlocker services can often prevent your users from accidentally visiting malicious (or legitimate but booby-trapped) web sites that contain these sorts of attacks. Nonetheless, we still recommend you install Microsoft’s updates to completely protect yourself from all of these flaws.

Status:

Microsoft has released patches to fix these vulnerabilities.

References:

This alert was researched and written by Corey Nachreiner, CISSP (@SecAdept).

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